What Microsoft got wrong with the Xbox One X


Recently, Microsoft unveiled their new gaming console the Xbox One X to be released this November, and it’s supposed to be the most powerful gaming console on the market, but in my humble opinion Microsoft got it wrong.

The specs on this system surpass any regular computer system on the market:

  • 8-core AMD processor, 12 GB of graphics memory with an Ultra HD 4K Drive for movies, along with 8 gigs of internal flash memory and a 1 terabyte harddrive for storage, all for a hefty price tag of $499.  

Additionally, the console runs on a Windows 10 platform, which means that Microsoft isn’t really selling a video game system at all.  

It’s a screaming fast computer that doesn’t come with a monitor, keyboard or mouse, and in this bloggers humble opinion, instead of advertising and marketing this system as just another gaming device with more power and selling it for the price of a new washing machine, Microsoft should have thrown in a wireless keyboard and mouse and advertised this system as a brand new whole home entertainment system that connects to your TV.

After all, who wouldn’t want to consolidate their technology and rid themselves of multiple devices; i.e. old computer, old monitors, old gaming device and old DVD/Blu-ray player, and replace it with one system that connects to their television?

This could have been the One system that set the standard by allowing end users to watch and play true 4k movies and video games.  Surf the web.  Shop Online.  Do their banking. Skype with friends and family in true 4k resolution…(with the optional 4k webcam of course)...and do it all with one system.

In addition Microsoft could offer the full Microsoft Office Suite as a promotion for anyone who exchanges an old gaming system for a new Xbox One X, offering even more incentives for those who exchange a Sony gaming system.

Accordingly, Microsoft could also spend a couple more years designing a smaller “X” device that would be a wireless hub allowing multi-user connections to multiple Microsoft accounts in various rooms of the house.  It could be similar to the Amazon Echo with Cortana’s voice recognition software and a builtin 4K webcam.

This would provide the Xbox One X to provide true “whole home” access while providing flexibility for end users to perform multiple engagements at the same time while using separate televisions in separate rooms of the house. 

For example, the main Xbox One device would be in the family room where one person is streaming a movie, while another family member is sitting in their bedroom playing a video game with an “X” device connected to their television, while yet another family member is working on homework using Microsoft Office with the “X” device connected to a third television in a third room of the house.  

Pathetically, Microsoft failed to create a whole home entertainment system and market it as such, and I firmly believe they missed an opportunity to corner the market on not only the gaming industry, but the home entertainment industry and the home computer industry as well.

Maybe in time Microsoft will figure it out, but for now…they got it wrong with the Xbox One X.

 

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “What Microsoft got wrong with the Xbox One X

  1. They may have such in mind, but money has to be made NOW! They have to get a product to market as soon as they can. That’s why computer products rarely come to the market in what anyone considers a perfect state.

    What you may wish to do is look at the current set of systems we use and compare them with the devices we use to use. The improvements are astounding and many are things people did not consider possible 20 years ago.

    New software and hardware makes applications possible that inventors did not even consider.

    Liked by 2 people

Herd Mooings

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s