Why the Electoral College Works


electoral-college-map

Here in the United States we use something called the Electoral college to choose our President.

Each state has a certain number of persons who are called “electors” that make up the Electoral College.  They are supposed to cast their vote based on the results of the overall vote count in their state.  

Contrary to popular belief, the popular vote actually does come into play, just not in the way most people would like it to, and for that reason the electoral college gets a bad rap.  

Some say that it’s outdated, others claim that it’s confusing, unfair or that it should be done away with completely; but I don’t agree because I believe that the electoral college was originally devised and well suited to its purpose.  

What purpose is that, you ask?  It’s three-fold.  

1) To make sure that states with a large population wouldn’t dominate the outcome of every Presidential election.

2) That every single state, no matter the population, would have a voice in who was elected president of the United States of America.

and 

3) That candidates would be forced to campaign in every single state and not just a select few that would give them the popular vote.  

And, my dear cattle, Number Three is where Hillary Clinton pathetically failed in her campaign and where Donald Trump pathetically succeeded.  

Because even though Hillary had 670,000+ more overall total votes than Donald Trump . . . Trump actually won the popular vote in more states: Trump – 31 versus Clinton – 19,  which means, that the Electoral College succeeded in fulfilling purpose #1, purpose #2 and yes, even purpose #3.

Basically, the electoral college comes down to this:  Win more states, win the presidency.  Lose more states . . . well. . . I think you get the point.

If it were up to the Overall popular vote count alone, states like California, Florida, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas would dominate the elections and the candidates would only campaign in those states where they know they would receive the most votes.  

Conversely, smaller populated states like Wyoming, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Idaho and Montana would be left out completely.

I know there are a lot of pathetic followers jumping on the bandwagon of electoral college outdatedness and who think the electoral college is a bad thing; heck, even Donald Trump thinks so . . . or he thought so, I’m not sure at this point . . . but either way the fact still remains, the more populous states shouldn’t have a greater influence in who gets elected and the electoral college works for that very reason!!

Every single state should have a voice!  

With that said…I want to add this:  I did not vote for either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, but IF those individuals who cast a vote in the electoral college don’t or won’t vote the way the citizens in their respective states directed them to vote, then it should be considered an act of treachery against what these United States stand for:  a nation of the people, by the people and for the people . . .  and that pathetic act of casting a vote against the citizen’s wishes should be considered an act of treason.  

Just my pathetic two cents

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9 thoughts on “Why the Electoral College Works

  1. I was going through the article in the newspaper here that covered the U.S. election and it repeatedly used the term, ‘Electoral College.’

    I had mentally made a note to Google it but now it seems I don’t have to. Thank you so much!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly, IB!!! A more populous state/city should never have influence over smaller states/cities. Every state should be represented and every vote should count!

      whether we like it or not the electoral college works!! 🙂 thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 2 people

Herd Mooings

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